Kajiya de Hajimeru Isekai Slow Life - Vol. 1 Ch. 4

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riiiightt.... That is definitely not how to make a long sword. Unless you got stuck in the bronze age.

And for the idjits.. Casting steel doesn't do much for carbon content when done right...
It's the fact that a cast cools slowly, which in turn affects the crystal structure of the steel that makes any cast sword absolutely useless. There's a solid reason for hardening and tempering cycles for steel ( and even iron..)
As opposed to copper/bronze swords which need slow cast-hardening to be worth anything as a weapon.

If in doubt, pick up a paint stripper/BBQ/bunsen burner and some wire and try for yourself. It doesn't take a forge to follow a damn youtube vid and learn something about the physics of metal... and plenty of REAL weaponsmiths showing their stuff there, explaining exactly why they do stuff as they do..
 

CBC

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@Grikath
He states that he's using Iron, not steel, but even then, I have so many questions, including and especially why he didn't harden the longsword (iron's hardened by repeatedly hitting it iirc).

I mean, I guess we can point to the dude's cheat allowing him to skip over several steps, but the Author (I read the LN, at least I can skip over the smithing parts) very clearly has not done their research on the smithing process. I literally just follow several blacksmithing channels on youtube and I've learned so much from them, there's no reason why the author can't do the same to start with.


Edit:
Oh, before I forget, thanks for the chapter!
 
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@CBC is the LN any different from the wn? It looked interesting so I went to read the wn and each "chapter" was about a paragraph in size which was super fucking annoying. So I dropped it.

Stamped knives that are mass produced go through repeated folding and reheating. Cast iron sword is basically going to shatter the moment it comes into contact with something even slightly harder with some force. I am going to assume the author didn't do proper research on it as well. Strange given he's from the land of superior japanese steel that has been folded over 10,000 times.
 
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@CBC

What makes you think an author lazily jumping on the isekai trend wouldn't also lazily not do research?
 
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@eytoots The author is referencing knowledge from said real life, why shouldn't there be standards and accountability? There are many authors that put time, and effort into researching what they write about; the readers here are correct, and entitled to saying so, about the laziness.
 
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seems like author should have watch forged in fire for a few seasons and maybe a few youtubes... thx for chap...

of course being what it is i always suspend real life to art issues but i think the author would benefit from said knowledge which would enrich the story process a bit
 

CBC

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@airmobius
Whoops, I keep interchanging LN and WN for some reason, so that's my bad on that. The WN itself isn't all that bad...until the MC starts describing how he smiths and it just keeps throwing me off, which is a shame because I really like the rest of the story tbh.

@HaikenEdge
If that ain't the truth. Maybe the author could have just skipped over the process or the artist instead did the research and drew actual smithing, and repeating myself here, it's a shame because it is a pretty good story with an honest-to-goodness slow and chilled plot barring one incident so far, but even then, he stuck to what he "knew" instead of trying to take the spotlight.
 
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this doesnt seems like blacksmithing at all... i doubt if the author know how to blacksmith or doing research about his works
 
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For those doubting the author's forging knowledge:

Cast Forging is very much a part of blacksmithing (and was widely used in europe during the middle ages , mainly to speed up production at the cost of sword strength). The forging he did seems fairly sound from what little got shown. The typical approach you see (like in the Forged in Fire series) is good for making individual swords/knives, but is too time consuming if you are trying to complete a large order. That is where cast forging comes into play. Cast forging can be significantly faster for making multiples of the same weapon (at the cost of a little drop in the strength in the sword).

The biggest issue I see is how he got the iron hot enough to completely melt it. Forging furnaces can't typically get hot enough to fully melt iron. You'd need something much stronger than that. It also skipped the tempering process completely (which is necessary to harden the swords, regardless of which forging method is used).
 
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I get worried when people speak about someone else not knowing something since those people are likely to not know anything either lmao
 
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@xboxbam
and was widely used in europe during the middle ages

Sauce plz? Always willing to broaden my knowledge, but as far as I'm aware neither the archeology nor the extant primary, or even secondary sources support that statement.
Spear/axe/mace heads.. not impossible, and for maces proven. Short blades... Can see the sense given the last resort use of the weapons, even though afaik there are no actual historical examples of cast short blades of medieval european origin.
"Long"swords ( of any type ) ... All extant historical medieval european pieces have been forged, not cast.

Maybe the method was used in the Middle-East or Asia, but I'm pretty certain it wasn't used in the medieval weapon production centers who had the monopoly on producing the stuff.
 
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@Grikath

Actually, I did remember incorrectly. It was the Vikings that predominantly used this cast-formed weapons during invasions, not the medieval european smiths. It was a history channel special about the viking's war invasion tactics covering how they invaded North America and fought the native americans (I don't remember the exact name of the series). They used rapid cast-bronze forging techniques with any copper/bronze metals they could find to make a roughly sword/ax/hammer shaped form and then hammer forged the remaining form of the shape to speed up the process. That episode casually mentioned about how that technique got carried over by smiths to use for large orders or low quality weapons in europe, but that those smiths put a bigger emphasis on the cast-forming side for those orders. Admittedly, they never mentioned what specific weapons those european smiths used cast-forming on. I also incorrectly called them medieval smiths. My bad.
 

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